4 Things To Left Off Your CV

Writing a CV is most challenging task for a job seeker. A CV can make or break your opportunity to get your dream job.

Candidates spend so much time in writing and styling their CVs that most of them they overdo it. Remember that an employer or recruiter is a busy person and has probably got a hundred CVs in front of her, including yours. A CV that is obscure, and old fashioned, may not be considered by the recruiter.

Mashable has posted a list of top 4 things to left off your CV, if you want to get it noticed by the employer:

1. An “objective.” This is the statement at the top of a CV that tells an employer what you’re looking for — but it’s got to go. They already know you’re interested in their job, so it’s unnecessary. Instead, use a “summary of qualifications” to introduce employers to your most relevant skills and experience, and to show them exactly how your experience can fit their needs.

2. Unrelated awards, hobbies and interests. A CEO once had a job seeker who claimed to be a “pig-wrestling champion” on his resume, which is a great accomplishment, I’m sure. But it had nothing to do with the job he applied for, and it distracted from the rest of his qualifications.

Unless it directly adds to your qualifications for the job or helps the employer see how you fit with their company culture (for example, if you’re applying to an outdoor apparel company and you are an avid hiker, that’s a hobby that matches their culture), leave it off your resume.

4 Things To Left Off Your CV

3. Too much formatting. Keep your CV simple, so recruiters can read it quickly and easily. Don’t use bold, italics and underlines all at once. Don’t use more than one font, and be consistent in the way you present information. Bulleted lists are much easier to read than paragraphs. Keep your CV single-spaced, and shrink your margins to a half inch. You’ll be surprised at how much space poor formatting can take up on your CV, pushing it far longer than it needs to be.

4. Lists of tasks for each job. Instead of telling recruiters what you did at your past jobs, tell them what you accomplished — what were the overarching results of your day-to-day tasks? Rather than rewriting your job description, tell recruiters how you did what you did and why it made a difference to your employer and customers.

You can also review these 4 tips for a top CV.


Back to Top